R-Kade Mini pictures

May 30, 2016

It’s been a while since I last wrote about R-Kade Mini so I thought I would share a couple of new-ish pictures. These were taken at Maker Faire UK in April.

R-Kade Mini Makerfaire2016-small

Instead of painting the cabinet I used black clothes dye instead. I’m please to report it work much better than I thought it would, giving it a nice flat black finish with no brush marks or paint smears. The decals were a mix of ones I printed off and some I bought off ebay. All in all I very pleased how it all turned out.

R-Kade Mini & Zero Makerfaire2016-small

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Hackaday.io: R-Kade Zero

February 26, 2016

I forgot to mention, you can also find build details on hackaday.io:

https://hackaday.io/project/9844-r-kade-zero


Kickstarter: R-Kade Zero

February 22, 2016

As many may already know I’ve built a number of Raspberry Pi based arcade systems over the last few years starting in 2012 with R-Kade, last year with R-Kade Mini and now my latest endeavour R-Kade Zero which fits into the palm of your hand.

So after receiving encouragement from a number of members at our local Maker Space I’ve took the plunge and started my first kickstarter for the R-Kade Zero mini arcade platform.

You can check it out at:

www.kickstarter.com/projects/1120658355/r-kade-zero

R-Kade_Zero_All_small


R-Kade getting a upgrade

February 27, 2015

The wiring in my Raspberry Pi mini arcade cabinet is getting a much needed upgrade.

I originally build R-Kade for Maker Faire 2013 and its been at various other Faire’s around the country and at eDay for the last two years. It was quickly build out of a bookshelves, old VGA monitor, WII arcade controller and a raspberry pi. The control board was removed from the WII arcade controller and the joystick and buttons wired directly to a prototyping board on the Pi. Unfortunately, it’s this wiring which is becoming a problem and needs redoing.

Rather than just strip out the wires and rewire new, I decided to make myself a better solution and have designed a Pi ArcadeIO board. The ArcadeIO board has screw terminals for connecting the wires to the Pi’s GPIO signals. In addition the GPIO signals have in-line resistors to limited the effects of any short circuits. There are addition screw terminal positions for connecting common grounds for the arcade switches and joystick.